• Advanced Audiology Assoc.

Even with mild hearing loss, your risk of dementia can double

Updated: Sep 9

Chances are, dementia has touched your life in some way. Whether you care for someone who is suffering, know someone who has been recently diagnosed, or have already lost a loved one to this dreadful disease.


We believe your hearing health should be treated with the same importance as the rest of your health, because hearing isn’t just what happens in your ears… hearing affects everything between your ears.

Every day, your brain engages in intense and intricate work to allow you to hear sounds. But if it’s compromised, your brain has to work even harder to fill in the gaps, meaning your brain is working overtime. Several studies have validated the link between hearing loss and other debilitating conditions and diseases, such as isolation, depression, and even Alzheimer’s and other dementia.



When should you see a professional about your hearing?


If left untreated, hearing loss may result in a poorer quality of life, related to isolation, reduced social activity, a feeling of being excluded, and increased symptoms of depression. There’s no better way to be proactive than to have your hearing checked annually. You should also contact an audiologist if you or a loved one are:

  • Straining to hear in situations that never used to be a problem such as crowded restaurants and public places

  • Having trouble in carrying on a telephone conversation

  • Struggling to hear video (Zoom/Facetime) conferences or meetings at work

  • Turning up the volume on your TV or radio, while others in the room complain that it’s too loud

  • Having trouble hearing sounds on your computer or portable device

  • Feeling like you’re not fully enjoying your favorite music and movies

  • Your line of work exposes you to loud noises over long periods of time

  • Avoiding social interactions


Hearing aids can help, both cognitively and socially. A hearing aid has the potential to bring someone with hearing loss back into the fold of their community, allowing them to take part in conversations instead of feeling excluded from them.


Make a commitment to take care of your hearing health because it’s not just a hearing problem, it’s a health problem.


To find out more about dementia and hearing loss, read this article published to the Cape & Plymouth Business Media by Leanne O’Neil Fletcher, Au.D.




For an appointment, call one of our offices:

Yarmouth Port: 508-385-5222

Mashpee: 508-539-9780

31 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All